Tag Archives: business

Expiration Dates

Everything has an expiration date, well except maybe true love and Jesus. Your job is to be prepared for the time when your marketing and/or sales efforts expire.

Whether it’s Facebook or LinkedIn, certain tools you use to help grow your business will no longer be effective. However, instead of holding on to those tools like their precious resources, you should have a succession plan in place.

What does a succession plan look like? It’s really just a marketing plan. Understanding your company, your target, and your why, will give you the foundation you need to be successful marketing on whichever platform makes sense for your business.

Having this solid marketing foundation will help your business adapt to any changes in the marketing sphere. The key is to always be paying attention to where your target spends their time. So, understanding your target becomes invaluable. Once you truly understand your target demographic, you can easily move channels with them.

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Unintentional wisdom from NFL wide receiver Terrell Owens

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During an interview on ESPN Radio, NFL wide receiver Terrell Owens was asked about his creative touchdown celebrations, and how he was able to keep developing original ideas. Owens said, “I was just trying to come up with something just a little more creative than the next celebration.” *

Let that unintentional wisdom sink in for a moment. More creative than the next celebration. He wasn’t worried about being more creative than the last celebration, he was trying to outdo a celebration that hadn’t even happened yet.

Thinking this way in business and marketing means you’re always trying to outdo what hasn’t been done yet. Which could put you in the strategic position to constantly be out-inventing and out-thinking not just your own capabilities, but your competitors. Don’t worry about out-thinking your own abilities, by the way, having a product or idea without the means to create it isn’t a bad thing. That’s an indication it’s time to grow!

* You can find the audio right around the 44 minute mark.

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The Top Three Mistakes I See Small Business Owners Make

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I wrote up these three ideas in response to a HARO query looking to compile a list of mistakes small business owners make. If you don’t know what HARO is, you should most definitely check it out.

Anyway, the three mistakes I submitted are as follows…

Continue reading

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I Love People Who Hate Money

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Every once in awhile I chat with a client, an associate, or a friend who has a story about bad customer service. But not of the normal variety. The situations that stand out to me are when a customer is trying to do business with a company that seemingly doesn’t want the business. It’s happened to me on several occasions as well. For the life of me, I can’t figure out why a business wouldn’t want a new customer. If their workload is too heavy and they don’t need me as a customer, the least they could do is tell me, right? It comes across like they hate money. But what I really mean is, it comes across like they hate their customers.

On that note, I’ve put together a quick list of things to do if you never want to make a sale:

1. Don’t return phone calls or emails from people who WANT to buy your product/service right now.

2. In fact, don’t ever respond to any email or answer any phone call.

3. Say you’ll do something and then don’t do it.

Now that I’ve got that off my chest. Let’s talk about the positive.

Things you should do NO MATTER WHAT to sell your product/service:

1. Sometimes it’s improbable to answer every single email and respond to every single phone call in a day, and I get that. So, layout a plan for responding. It could be phone calls are responded to same day, and emails are responded to in 12 hours.

2. This next one is so simple it’s scarey. If you say you’re going to do something, do it. If you aren’t going to be able to do what you said you were going to do when you said you were going to do it, then say so. Honesty is awesome.

3. Which brings me to this. Be honest with your customers. It won’t hurt you, and it certainly won’t hurt them.

As you’ve probably noticed, these things have less to do with actually making money, and more to do with taking care of your customers. If you take care of your customers, I promise they’ll take care of you.

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Take Care…

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So, I didn’t come up with this diagram. I’ve borrowed the idea. Unfortunately, I don’t remember who originally came up with the concept. However, the idea is sound. And true.

Starting at the top, if the owner takes care of the employees, the employees will take care of the customers. In turn, the customers will take care of the company, and the company will take care of the owner.

Occasionally, what happens is that the owner will just take care of the customers or the company, effectively turning his back on the employees. Often, this happens because the owner doesn’t (or most likely won’t) trust his team. There is no quicker way to disenfranchise your employees than to turn your back on them.

If you don’t trust your team, and if you’re being honest, that means you really don’t trust yourself. Otherwise you would trust your ability to put a great team together. You would be able to delegate responsibilities knowing they’d be managed effectively. Your focus would stay on managing, mentoring, building, growing and, more importantly, leading your team.

Focus on building a company that follows this cycle and you’ll create a happier team, a happier company, and happier customers.

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Pump the Brakes

The other night I was helping my son with his math homework as he was struggling to understand a problem. When the question asked to find the perimeter of a square, he wanted to solve for the area. I soon realized his biggest challenge was that he was thinking too fast. When he slowed down to think through the question, he was able to solve it with ease.

Too many times I see people that are in such a hurry to make money, put out a fire, complain about a disaster, or sign a client that they never take time to pump the brakes.

There are times when being foolhardy can be an invaluable asset. That said, understanding the landscape of a specific situation is never a bad thing. Especially when the solution you keep trying always lands you right back where you started.

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