Category Archives: Success

The Bait and Switch Follow on Twitter

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The bait and switch method on Twitter doesn’t build your brand, but it does do a great job of destroying your character.

Let’s define this for clarity. A Bait and Switch Follower is a person or brand that follows you on Twitter. However, once you follow back they unfollow you. The strategy here is to grow their own followers while keeping the accounts they follow at a smaller number. This would give the illusion that this person or brand is popular, as well as exclusive: they only follow back prestigious accounts.

If you’re a pastor, a blogger, a writer, a CEO or a general good person, this method is embarrassing. You aren’t building trust, brand equity, favor or loyalty, you’re just building followers. What’s more important to you, growing followers or growing your business?

I believe in reciprocity on Twitter. If someone follows me and I appreciate their content, I typically follow back. I then monitor my followers fairly closely with Commun.it. Using Commun.it allows me to see who continued to follow me after I followed them back.

There’s no fast way to the top when it comes to social media. Buying followers or likes, bait and switch following strategies, they are all fools gold. The only real way to grow your social channels is through quality content, real engagement, and a solid strategy for growing followers and likes.

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Don’t say sorry, apologize… then ask for forgiveness

There’s a difference between saying you’re sorry and asking someone to forgive you.

Years ago, my wife and I did the Growing Kids God’s Way curriculum. In it, the Ezzos talk about having your kids apologize when they get in trouble. Not only that, but the Ezzos recommend having your kids ask for forgiveness. According to the Ezzos, and later confirmed by me in practice, this repairs any damage done by the mistake.

Back when I selling advertising, I had an issue with a client. An agency. In fact, one of the largest agencies in town. I could’ve easily blamed the client, or found some other way to blameshift, but the responsibility was clearly mine. Instead of take the easy way out, I took the Ezzos’ advice and apologized to the client. I then asked for forgiveness. The client began trusting me more, despite my mistake.

Today’s world – with cell phones, social media, instant messaging, etc. – it’s easier than ever to be a flake. Don’t flake. You’re better than that.

Don't just say sorry

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The Next Epic Failure

I’m learning to look forward to the next epic failure.

As Jamie Hollister likes to say when mentoring someone, “look, I’m gonna let you down. Eventually. It’s bound to happen. I’m human.”

The fact is, I’m going to make another mistake. I’m going to fail. Again. And again. And again.

Instead of being afraid, I’m learning to embrace the next failure. You know why? Because I can learn from it. I grow from it. I can become better. I can endure more. The next epic failure will be an experience, and I welcome it.

Dear brothers and sisters, when troubles of any kind come your way, consider it an opportunity for great joy. For you know that when your faith is tested, your endurance has a chance to grow. So let it grow, for when your endurance is fully developed, you will be perfect and complete, needing nothing.
James 1:2

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You can’t win them all

You won’t close every deal. You won’t convert every visitor to your website. Not every person that passes your trade show booth will love your product. And that’s ok.

I’ve said this before – and it’s an idea I’ve been borrowing for some time – that every “no” gets you that much closer to a “yes.” What does that mean? It means that if your success rate is 4 out of every 10, or 40%, you’ll need at least 6 people to tell you “no” before 4 people can say “yes.”

This should encourage you. Don’t worry about every lost deal. Do what you can to learn from that interaction – was your price too high or too low, were you too aggressive or not aggressive enough, etc. and then get ready for the next potential customer.

You can’t and won’t win them all. Stay focused on the success rate, and always try to leave everyone in better shape than you found them.

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Save Time and Do Less

The folks over at WeWork have put together a great blog post that features seven tricks and tips to save time by doing less. It’s a great article on productivity, especially as it concerns being efficient.

My favorite tip – although they are all excellent – concerns the delegation of certain tasks. From the blog post:

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10 Trade Show Tips and Tricks

A few weeks ago, I went to the Shot Show with a client. Before I get into the tips for a successful

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trade show, let me start by saying WOW! The Shot Show was by far the biggest show I’ve attended. I know that shows like CES are bigger (I’ve never been), but this was almost overwhelming.

Anyway, while I was at the Shot Show, I noticed that a lot of the vendors didn’t seem to have a clue as to how to run their booth. Based on that, I thought I’d come up with a list of tips for those who are willing to admit they can use some help.

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The Wonderful Curse

The funny thing with doing something awesome the first time is that you end up being expected to do the same every time.

Now, I didn’t say “the challenge with doing something awesome…” because, in all honesty, this should be considered a good thing. Awesomeness (or excellence) should never be a burden. This is why I call excelling at a given task The Wonderful Curse.

Setting the bar high for yourself should be routine, but you should also expect the fallout – good and bad. The good being that you worked hard and completed a task well. The bad being, you will now be held to that standard, but is that really a bad thing.

The only real cure to the curse is to work hard regardless (if you’re a Christ Follower, read “work hard for the Lord). Do work you can be proud of no matter what. If it doesn’t meet someone else’s awesomeness standard, you can at least still sleep at night knowing you did your best.

 

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Beating a Dead Horse

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I’ve talked about this before, and I’m talking about it again because I still see it all the time.

You can’t just start a business – a retail store, a restaurant, a consulting firm, etc. – and expect people to magically show up. Customers don’t fall off trees. It’s not “build it and they will come.” It’s build it, talk about it, advertise it, market it and hopefully they will come.

It’s tell a story. Tell a good story. Then trust that the story is so good people will start telling it for you. I can’t say it loud enough or often enough, but an open sign hanging in your window simply is not enough. If you want to succeed, you have to do more. There is no magic pill – no simple solution to becoming a success – other than hard (smart) work.

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Looking for Work

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Well, it finally happened. It took longer than I thought – about a week – but I was finally hit with the realization that I’m unemployed, again.

This feeling isn’t new. I was laid-off at the beginning of the recession in 2008. Since then, I’ve had three different jobs for three different employers. Some of those jobs I left voluntarily, some of them I didn’t. The feeling eventually hits you, it’s just a matter of when.

Whether you were fired, laid-off, or you quit, the important thing is to learn from the experience. Take away the good and the bad and become a better person for it. Secondly, approach finding the next job as if it were a job. But don’t just apply for jobs, network too. Sometimes the best job isn’t obtained because you applied for it. You might even have to spend money to make money.

If you’re in the same boat as me, good luck. Oh, and don’t settle. Find more than your next job, find your career.

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Success through failure and Batman quotes

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There are a million quotes you could use to summarize why failing is an important aspect of achieving success. My generation will be remembered for many reasons, not the least of which is social media and comic books turned into movies. So, it’s only appropriate that I quote Batman Begins as why failing is important. “And why do we fall, Bruce?” Thomas Wayne asks his frightened son. “So we can learn to pick ourselves up.”

Not everyone is good at everything. Failing has the ability to enlighten areas of improvement. The key comes from being able to recognize why failure occurred. If every time Bruce fell he simply blamed it on the environment, he would never adjust his feet to walking or learn to tie his shoes more securely. Failing is almost essential to achieving success in business, life, love and whatever else you can think of. It helps you build a foundation for moving mountians.

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